Archives for category: Tutorials


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In our last post, we talked about the need for companies to start thinking beyond social marketing. The reasons are simple:

1. If all your business does on social channels is market itself, anyone who isn’t already an ardent fan will eventually tune you out.

2. Social marketing is not social business. If you want to truly establish social business practices (and there are clear business advantages to doing it), you are going to have to incorporate social media into critical, non-marketing functions outside of marketing. (Say customer support, business development, community management, HR, etc.)

Last time, we focused on customer support. Today, let’s take a look at crisis management.

The first piece of knowledge we want to put on the table is that PR crises today are not like the PR crises of yesteryear. Because of social channels, they now snowball at an exponential rate. Whatever the cause may be (an insensitive tweet fired off by your digital agency, photos of your CEO hunting elephant, one of your drilling rigs blowing up off the coast of Florida or your airline breaking guitars), the mechanics of the crisis management game have changed. Without a digital crisis management action plan, you’re dead in the water. Worse, without a digital monitoring practice, you’ll never even know what hit you. So what do you say we take a quick look at how crisis management looks to the eyes of a company whose social business investment includes more than just marketing?

Not too long ago, @KitchenAid’s had to deal with a PR crisis of its own. We took some screen shots of what it looked like on our own dashboard. If you aren’t familiar with what happened and what the crisis was about, you can catch up here (just remember to come back).

Let’s start at the beginning:

1. Discovery

The more vigilant you are, the easier it will be to avoid major PR disasters. It really isn’t complicated. And thanks to modern digital tools, all it takes to set up an early warning system for your company is the will to do so, and a little bit of forward thinking on the part of your brand or product management team. (If you don’t want to do it internally, you can easily work with your agency of record to set something up.)

In the case of KitchenAid, the crisis was identified early. This allowed management to start working on it in that first hour, which is critical given that Mashable first reported on the incident about an hour after it happened.) Speed matters.

Tip: Since you can’t necessarily anticipate what a PR crisis will be about, it’s difficult to set up keyword searches in advance. Usually, monitoring your brand and product names will have to do. However, note the increase in volume of mentions in the above screenshot (to the right of the vertical orange line). Do you see it? It looks like a wave. Using a monitoring tool that provides some measure of data visualization can help you spot sudden changes in the volume of mentions. Such a change doesn’t have to be negative, but it is a warning that something has happened and that you need to look into it.

You may also want to see where the complaints are coming from and how they are spreading over time. One of our screens comes with a handy map you can zoom in and out of, so whether you are a global brand looking to gauge the overall impact of a PR crisis over time or a chain with retail outlets across several regions, you can pinpoint the precise location of brand mentions anywhere in the world and see exactly where your trouble spots are (center of image). You can also click on those points of mention and see exactly what was said and by whom. A menu also lets you select what channels you want to monitor on the map, so if you only want to look at Twitter and blogs, you can do that. Tickr Command Center also plots the number of mentions per channel (top right of image below) so you can get a sense for each channel’s impact on the crisis itself (and its resolution). Handy if you need to prioritize your efforts or just like to have extra points of data in hand when you deliver your report to the powers that be.

Tickrnew001

2. Analysis

This is where it helps to have a PR professional in place who understands the mechanics, culture and language of digital crisis management, and a digital team that is capable of executing on a coordinated response. Monitoring alone can’t fix it. (Hey, we can only do so much.) Competent and well-prepared humans have to handle the response.

Tip: Your response should be quick. By quick, we don’t mean 24 hours like in the good old days. We don’t even mean 2 hours. We mean inside of 10 minutes. The quicker the response, the shorter and smaller the crisis. It pays to be vigilant and ready.

Tickr Command Center lets you drill down into particular time segments to see (live or retroactively) how conversations about your product or brand are evolving:

3. Response

How a company first responds to a crisis will set the stage for everything that comes afterwards. Here is a quick primer on how to respond to a crisis quickly and effectively:

  1. Introduce yourself. Use your name and your title.
  2. Frame the situation for the public. State the facts. What happened? When did it happen? What is your actual position in regards to the crisis? Apologize. Don’t spin. Don’t lie. Establish trust and leadership.
  3. Communicate to the public what comes next and what they should expect.
  4. Communicate to the press the response schedule and structure, and the means by which they should obtain information from you.
  5. Communicate developments and milestones with the public as they happen (the frequency will depend on the crisis). Err on the side of giving them too many updates. Make them feel that you are dedicated to fixing the problem in the most expedient and transparent way possible.

To KitchenAid’s credit, this process is precisely the one that was used by Cynthia Soledad and the company’s crisis team, and it worked. Note that the crisis abated shortly after KitchenAid’s official response. (See red line in the screen shot above.)

4. Management

There are essentially two main pieces to the management phase. The first is a continuation of the “update the public” function that began in the response phase. This can involve the creation of a crisis page and a Twitter account alongside existing communications channels. (BP did this during the Deep Sea Horizon crisis.) The second is the direct interaction between the company and the public across social platforms. That is where community management, the creation of discussion groups and tabs, the publishing of fact sheets becomes very important. In some cases, (like the posting of an offensive tweet) a quick explanation of what happened and an apology will do the job. In other instances, the problem goes far deeper than that and will require more work. (Examples: An investigation by a major news organization just uncovered that your company employs child labor in a number of countries around the world. A report from a global ecological watchdog paints your company as being a major source of air or water pollution. Your CEO has just found himself connected to a damaging corruption scandal. These sorts of things won’t just go away with an apology.)

Whether your crisis can easily handled with an apology and a few hours of work on social channels or will require months of heavy lifting and changes made to your business practices, by engaging with the public and listening to their complaints, a company can identify key topics they need to focus on. These topics will frame the conversation that the public ultimately wants to have with the company. The more focus exchanges have, the more likely it is that they can be shifted from pointless noise to purposeful signal. Here, listening with purpose will make all the difference in the world.

Once a company has identified topics and themes, it can dig deeper and identify specific complaints that relate to them. Once these complaints have been clarified, the discussion process can now be shifted from conflict to collaboration. Remember that every complaint simply identifies a problem. Once a problem is identified, all the company has to do is acknowledge it, drill down into the specific objections, and ask the public how it would solve it. In doing so, the company moved the dynamics of its relationship with an angry public from conflict to collaboration.

The next step is to rededicate your company’s focus to fixing the problem. Even if the best you can realistically offer is an incremental process that could take years, start that process. Show that the issue matters by turning the change into an initiative. Pledge to work on it. Recruit the help of the public. Partner with them. Make them part owners of the solution. Reward them for their help.

In the case of KitchenAid, the problem was far more easily solved, but it’s important to understand that while some PR crisis may only turn into a rough few days, others can cost companies everything. It’s important to have measure in place to make sure that each type of PR crisis is handled properly and that as little as possible is left to chance.

5. Post-crisis monitoring & advocacy

This part is simply the follow-through. Now that the crisis itself has ended, it’s time to button things up. What did you miss? What did you learn? What comes next?

Don’t let the deflation of the wave of mentions be your only guide. News cycles are short-lived nowadays. People will grow bored of a scandal or PR crisis after a few short days, no matter how effective a company was at addressing and managing it. But just because people have moved on to another topic doesn’t mean that your troubles are over. Don’t mistake changes in the volume of mentions for resolution. Your image may have been tarnished even if you aren’t the hot topic on Twitter anymore. That’s just as dangerous.

Note: If the root cause of the crisis was not resolved, it will stick. It will become part of the brand’s story. It may even become the defining feature of the brand for years to come – a stain on its reputation that won’t easily go away once it grows roots. You don’t want that. A crisis can’t just go away. It has to be resolved.

In the case of KitchenAid, here is what things looked like two weeks later:

The only way to find out if it has been resolved or if it has just gone away for a while is to monitor conversations about the brand once the crisis has subsided. There is a short term piece to this, and there is a long term piece as well. You want to gauge the impact of what you’ve done, and make adjustments along the way until you can be certain that the crisis, its cause, and the expectations of the public have been worked through. Once that’s done, look for people who are not aware that you have resolved the problem, and politely, kindly engage them. Show them the progress you’ve made. Link to what you have done and what you are doing. Inform, inform, inform. Whom you inform, when, how and why cannot happen in a vacuum. Monitoring for specific types of opinions and conversations can help you target the right people at the right time with the right information. This allows you to get your message across quickly and effectively without requiring major media buys and hit-or-miss campaigns. Think major cost-savings, sure, but think also of speed and effectiveness.

We hope that was helpful. So again, the point today was threefold:

1. Run you through the 5 phases of a digital crisis as seen through the eyes of a digital crisis management team that uses Tickr Command Center as one of its tools.

2. Show you yet another reason why creating social business practices (or having a “social media strategy”) should focus on a lot more than just creating and publishing social marketing content.

3. Illustrate the real value of looking at social media investment and activity beyond just social marketing.

If you aren’t using Tickr Command Center yet, check out what we can do for you here. (There’s a lot more to it than what we showed you today). Bear in mind that a tool like Command Center doesn’t need to necessarily replace other monitoring software. Most of our users tend to pair Tickr with a half dozen or more other digital management solutions in order to amplify their capabilities. Definitely try us out.

You can also come say hello on Facebook and Twitter. We won’t spam you with useless marketing content. Scout’s honor.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team.

tickr_ipad_03_790

Yesterday, we introduced you to a handful of new features involving common data sources like Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr and Yelp! You guys seemed to like that, so we figured that we should also mention – for those of you who haven’t worked with the enterprise version of our product – that Tickr can be made to work with data from pretty much any source you want.

In other words, if news sites, blogs and social media feeds aren’t enough, you can feed Tickr whatever else you want to. It can be internal data like sales numbers and volume of phone calls into customer support. It can be marketing-specific metrics like share of voice, web traffic, conversions and  even Klout scores. You can basically plug anything you want into Tickr and plot it on a timeline.

Let’s look at three examples of what that looks like. First, here is a basic version of what a purely quantitative custom Tickr screen:

Tickr mockup 002

Note: the above example is just a mock-up to illustrate the functionality. The data isn’t real. You can also go watch a live version of it here so you see how it behaves. (Most of the tabs and links have been deactivated but you’ll get the idea.) The point is to help you visualize what Tickr can do outside of the standard functionality that you are probably used to. Think comparative analytics, data correlation, market intelligence, product line comparisons, competitor monitoring, and so on. Your imagination is the limit.

If you prefer a mix of qualitative and quantitative data, you can build your report to look more like this:

tickr mockup 003

You can go see the live version of that mock-up here. Same thing as before: the data isn’t real and some of the functionality has been turned off. It’s just an illustration of what Tickr can do with a mix of standard and custom data.

In this example, pay particular attention to the tab titled Correlation Score (in green). If you’ve ever tried to map ROI paths along a timeline, guess what: Tickr can do that. (Note: if you want to, we can talk about how to properly measure ROI in a future post. It’s an important topic and we can definitely help you with that too.)

The screenshot below looks a little more like the Tickr overview screen you are used to, but if you look carefully, you will notice that it is a quantitative/qualitative custom configuration that combines news, stocks, unit sales and Tweets along a common timeline. As always, the timeline is completely searchable.

tickr_ipad_10_790

If you are an executive team, a PR firm or a CEO working on a big announcement (like a major government contract, a much anticipated new product release, a major acquisition or a quarterly earnings report,) having the ability to simultaneously monitor mentions of your brand in the news and social channels and see in real time the impact that this event is having on leads, website visits, sales and even stock price, is pretty powerful. (Sorry… long sentence.) The point is that Tickr lets you do that. We’re a lot more than just a handy monitoring platform.

If you have any questions about any of this, don’t hesitate to contact our customer support team. If you don’t feel like being quite that formal, it’s okay to approach us on Facebook and on Twitter. That’s what we’re there for.

Until we chat again, we hope we’ve given you a lot to think about.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team.

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While we have your attention, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest (going on right now):

The categories are non-profitjournalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a brief case study or summary of how you used Command Center before mid-March.

Make it as simple as you want. It doesn’t have to be fancy. The most creative and/or interesting case studies/summaries will win. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! So sign up here and have fun playing with Command Center.

 

A lot goes into building tools like Tickr’s Command Center. There’s a lot of tinkering going on, a lot of tweaking, a lot of getting under the hood and adding new and better stuff. In a way, we’re kind of like the wrench monkeys of the digital world: we spend all day tinkering in our digital garage, building badder, hotter, faster stuff. (By the way, you probably don’t want to wear white around our offices. Fair warning.)

Anyway, we spent all weekend supercharging the hot rod, and we’re pretty happy with the results. Here’s what’s new this week:

Twitter controls:  Until now, you could browse tweets in our timeline but not respond to them without first clicking on the source and accessing the actual tweet (in Twitter). We didn’t like the extra step, so we got rid of it. You can now reply, retweet or favorite a tweet directly from Tickr. Status: All users
Tickr new1
Flickr: You can now also add a Flickr source when creating a new Tickr page. Status: All users
Tickrnew2
Yelp! We can also add Yelp business locations, though for now, this feature is only configurable on the back end. We will let you know when this feature will be made available to everyone (hopefully soon). Status: Enterprise
Tickrnew3
Pinterest: We can follow Pinterest boards. Like Yelp!, this is only configurable on the back end for now, but we hope to change that soon. (One step at a time.) Note:  Tickr being mostly focused on monitoring and analytics, the beta currently only allows a user to follow a board, not to repin or like. We will let you know when we add additional functionality and when we make this feature available to all users. Status: Enterprise
We have a lot more exciting new releases scheduled for the next few weeks, so stay tuned and Tickr on.

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While we have your attention, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest while you still can:

The categories are non-profit, journalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a brief case study or summary of how you used Command Center before mid-March.

Make it as simple as you want. It doesn’t have to be fancy. The most creative and/or interesting case studies/summaries will win. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! So sign up here and have fun playing with Command Center.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team

Let’s say that you are a brand manager, an agency working with a brand, a journalist following a brand (or just an ardent fan of a brand,) and you need to know what is being said about that brand, where it is being said, by whom, and when. Obviously, Tickr takes care of that for you, but let’s look at how easy it is to use.

Let’s start by building a simple brand page in the basic trial version. For the purposes of this post, let’s pick Nike (iconic brand, lots of content, and Nike was in the news this week because of rumors of its new shoe’s pricing and the Lance Armstrong decision).

By now, you’ve created an accountlogged in, and you’ve built your page by just typing “Nike” in the box. If you haven’t done that yet, start here.

After a few seconds, here is what your basic Tickr page for Nike should basically look like:

First, let’s get situated. Top left of your screen is your page tab. (See below.) If you are using the free trial version, you only get one page at a time. If you have signed up for the pro version, you can have several tabs per page. So what you could do there is do comparative analysis of say Nike vs. Adidas, or deeper analysis of the Nike brand by refining your use of keywords. For instance: Nike, Nike Football, Nike Soccer, Nike Shoes, Nike retail, etc.

Next, look to the top right of your screen. (See below.) Though when your page launches, it will default to automatic scrolling, you can switch to manual scrolling, either by clicking on the up and down arrows or the on/off button. Your choice.

You can also easily share your page with friends and colleagues, edit your page, and there is also a help page that will help you navigate all of the elements of the page in case you have forgotten how to do something.

Now let’s look at the content being displayed on the page.

As you can see, each source of data is clearly displayed and color-coded so your eyes can easily discern between blogs, news, Twitter, Facebook, etc.

Here is how each source timeline further breaks down: the boxes of text and the images you see at the top of each timeline are called content windows. They are there to give you a sense for what kind of content is being shared and create context.

The gray blocks below the content windows make up the activity graph. You can interact with all of these elements at any time just by clicking on them. (See below.)

So for instance, if you click on the blogs feed’s content window featuring the “Just Do It – Four Steps to Filmmaking,” you can pre-select it. In the top right of that window is a little symbol with a box and an arrow. Click on it and you will access the page that the original content came from. (See below.)

In that particular instance, the link took me to Garrett Robinson’s blog (hi Garrett), where I can read the full post.  (See below.)

Now, if I were a community manager for Nike, I might decide to do nothing with that information… or I might reach out to Garrett and thank him for the mention, or make Nike resources available to him, or decide to share his content on a community blog, Facebook page or via Twitter. The options will vary depending on your role, your objectives, the opportunities and risks presenting themselves, but the point is that this feature allows you to go beyond simple content discovery. It allows you to drill down into stories, mentions and content, explore them fully, and interact with them at will.

What about the activity graph? Same thing. Click on any bar you want, and you will be able to drill down into a summary of the activity for that time frame. (See below.)

Once the window for that time frame is open, you can scroll up and down (or move to the previous time frame or the next without having to close the window, which is kind of handy).

Top right of each item in the summary window is a hyperlink, allowing you to go straight to the source if you want to. Same as with the content window. The feature also works with the Flickr feed:

See? Super easy.

On the macro level, a Tickr page works as a visual ticker that aggregates then organizes data from a breadth of relevant sources. Dedicate a screen to it in your office, lobby or digital mission control center, and you will immediately get a sense for the volume of conversations and mentions going on about your brand, what category of channels these conversations and mentions are taking place on, and what the nature of these conversations and mentions is. The page’s design and automated updates can therefore alert you to shifts in attention, to the impact of breaking stories, the possibility of looming PR crises, the effectiveness of a campaign, the stickiness of a message, etc. (We’ll get into those and more in upcoming posts.)

On a micro level, the ability to drill down into the content summaries then track mentions directly back to their source 1. allows you to understand then analyze mentions and conversations, 2. choose who you want to interact with and where, and 3. gives you complete control over the degree of engagement you want to have with your audience and/or community.

Combining Tickr’s macro and micro capabilities makes for a pretty powerful social media monitoring and management tool.

We’ll focus on more advanced features in future posts, so stay tuned. (There’s a lot more to talk about.)

In the meantime, feel free to try Tickr’s free trial version, and if you haven’t yet, unlock some new features by creating an account (recommended if you want richer results and want to be able to build pages with more than one tab/keyword at a time).

And as always, don’t be shy: share your thoughts and feedback with us, either in the comment section below or by contacting us.

We hope this post was helpful to you.

Return to the Tickr home page.

By now, we’ve all heard of second screen, right?

If you haven’t…

Second Screen is a term that refers to an additional electronic device (e.g. tabletsmartphone) that allows a television audience to interact with the content they are consuming, such as TV shows, movies, music, or video games, extra data is displayed on a portable device synchronized with the content being viewed on television. – Wikipedia

By the way, the term second-screen isn’t limited to TV anymore. It really all depends on what your first screen is and what you’re doing with it. Also, for obvious reasons, the notion is being expanded to third, fourth, and even fifth screen experiences. Why? Three major reasons:

1. Because people can. Using multiple screens, devices and apps to build a 360° participatory experience has gotten fairly easy and even fun to both set up and manage. It’s also fairly inexpensive. The technological and even economic barriers of entry for that sort of thing are considerably lower today than they were five years ago.

2. Because there is value there. You can do research on a topic or factoid you just learned about. You can discover new twitter accounts or websites and go check them out right there and then. You can look up a product you’ve just discovered via your first screen. You can join a discussion, monitor conversations or gauge reactions relating to whatever is happening on your first screen. You could also be checking emails, playing games or posting pictures of your cat on instagram. It’s really up to you what you use your second screen/device for: work, fun, both, you decide.

According to Nielsen, back in 2011, 70% of tablet owners and 68% of smartphone owners were already reporting using their devices while watching television. So… is second screen a distraction? Is it an enhanced experience? You decide. It depends on your intent and on what you do on your second device or monitor. It can be a distraction, it can be a mode of digital multitasking, or it can be purposeful. Probably because we can be most helpful to folks looking to get more out of their digital experiences, we sort of prefer the latter.

3. Why not?

All right. Practical application time: Say you are interested in following an event (like a conference) but either can’t attend, or are limited in terms of attending every session. Either way, your boss wants you to write about it or just report back to the executive team on all the most relevant stuff discussed there. What do you do?

Option 1: Take notes, then use a combination of the event’s own website, online searches (like Google and Bing) and Twitter hashtags to find more content about the event, then spend a lot of hours sifting through pages and pages of search results. Depending on when you happen to conduct your searches and how much traffic some channels and websites pull, your results will… well, vary. With a few pots of coffee on the side and a daisy chain of browser tabs, you ought to get it all worked out in a day or two… or three.

Option 2: Fit it all on just 2 screens and make things easier on yourself (and/or your research assistant). To illustrate what we’re talking about, below are two examples involving recent conferences.

Example A: An easy way to follow the 2012 DreamForce event in San Francisco (#DF12).

Screen 1: The DreamForce event’s live-stream ( http://www.youtube.com/dreamforce ). It’s kind of like being there but without… you know, being there.

Screen 2: News and social content from and about the Dreamforce event ( Tickr’s DreamForce page ). Tweets, Facebook updates and conversations, instagram photos, new coverage and blogs all on one screen, with activity graphs to show you shifts in activity volume per channel category.

Sure, there are other ways of doing this, but there aren’t many that make life so easy for you. (You can be up and going in about 30 seconds.)

Example B: An easy way to follow the 2012 Social Good Summit (#SGSglobal)

Screen 1: The Social Good Summit’s live-stream ( http://new.livestream.com/Mashable/SGS ).

Screen 2: News and social content for and about  the Social Good Summit ( the #SGSGlobal Tickr page ). Again, tweets, Facebook updates and conversations, instagram photos, new coverage and blogs all on one screen, with activity graphs to show you shifts in activity volume per channel category along a 48hr timeline.

Whether you’re monitoring an event from the inside or attending remotely, blending live-streamed content and Tickr to aggregate news and social content makes sure you don’t accidentally miss anything important. And the cool thing about using Tickr is that you can go back in time by using the timeline activity graph and revisit content you might have missed – whether it’s an hour ago or two days ago. Cool, huh?

The Social Good Summit is going on through Monday, so try it out for yourselves and let us know how that two-screen model worked for you. (Great event, by the way. Definitely take some time to watch the videos and follow some of the discussions. Really inspiring stuff.)

As always, feel free to check us out on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. (We’re pretty decent about answering questions there.)

Let’s say that you are a brand manager, an agency working with a brand, a journalist following a brand (or just an ardent fan of a brand,) and you need to know what is being said about that brand, where it is being said, by whom, and when. Obviously, Tickr takes care of that for you, but let’s look at how easy it is to use.

Let’s start by building a simple brand page in the basic trial version. For the purposes of this post, let’s pick Nike (iconic brand, lots of content, and Nike was in the news this week because of rumors of its new shoe’s pricing and the Lance Armstrong decision).

By now, you’ve created an account, logged in, and you’ve built your page by just typing “Nike” in the box. If you haven’t done that yet, start here.

After a few seconds, here is what your basic Tickr page for Nike should basically look like:

First, let’s get situated. Top left of your screen is your page tab. (See below.) If you are using the free trial version, you only get one page at a time. If you have signed up for the pro version, you can have several tabs per page. So what you could do there is do comparative analysis of say Nike vs. Adidas, or deeper analysis of the Nike brand by refining your use of keywords. For instance: Nike, Nike Football, Nike Soccer, Nike Shoes, Nike retail, etc.

Next, look to the top right of your screen. (See below.) Though when your page launches, it will default to automatic scrolling, you can switch to manual scrolling, either by clicking on the up and down arrows or the on/off button. Your choice.

You can also easily share your page with friends and colleagues, edit your page, and there is also a help page that will help you navigate all of the elements of the page in case you have forgotten how to do something.

Now let’s look at the content being displayed on the page.

As you can see, each source of data is clearly displayed and color-coded so your eyes can easily discern between blogs, news, Twitter, Facebook, etc.

Here is how each source timeline further breaks down: the boxes of text and the images you see at the top of each timeline are called content windows. They are there to give you a sense for what kind of content is being shared and create context.

The gray blocks below the content windows make up the activity graph. You can interact with all of these elements at any time just by clicking on them. (See below.)

So for instance, if you click on the blogs feed’s content window featuring the “Just Do It – Four Steps to Filmmaking,” you can pre-select it. In the top right of that window is a little symbol with a box and an arrow. Click on it and you will access the page that the original content came from. (See below.)

In that particular instance, the link took me to Garrett Robinson’s blog (hi Garrett), where I can read the full post.  (See below.)

Now, if I were a community manager for Nike, I might decide to do nothing with that information… or I might reach out to Garrett and thank him for the mention, or make Nike resources available to him, or decide to share his content on a community blog, Facebook page or via Twitter. The options will vary depending on your role, your objectives, the opportunities and risks presenting themselves, but the point is that this feature allows you to go beyond simple content discovery. It allows you to drill down into stories, mentions and content, explore them fully, and interact with them at will.

What about the activity graph? Same thing. Click on any bar you want, and you will be able to drill down into a summary of the activity for that time frame. (See below.)

Once the window for that time frame is open, you can scroll up and down (or move to the previous time frame or the next without having to close the window, which is kind of handy).

Top right of each item in the summary window is a hyperlink, allowing you to go straight to the source if you want to. Same as with the content window. The feature also works with the Flickr feed:

See? Super easy.

On the macro level, a Tickr page works as a visual ticker that aggregates then organizes data from a breadth of relevant sources. Dedicate a screen to it in your office, lobby or digital mission control center, and you will immediately get a sense for the volume of conversations and mentions going on about your brand, what category of channels these conversations and mentions are taking place on, and what the nature of these conversations and mentions is. The page’s design and automated updates can therefore alert you to shifts in attention, to the impact of breaking stories, the possibility of looming PR crises, the effectiveness of a campaign, the stickiness of a message, etc. (We’ll get into those and more in upcoming posts.)

On a micro level, the ability to drill down into the content summaries then track mentions directly back to their source 1. allows you to understand then analyze mentions and conversations, 2. choose who you want to interact with and where, and 3. gives you complete control over the degree of engagement you want to have with your audience and/or community.

Combining Tickr’s macro and micro capabilities makes for a pretty powerful social media monitoring and management tool.

We’ll focus on more advanced features in future posts, so stay tuned. (There’s a lot more to talk about.)

In the meantime, feel free to try Tickr’s free trial version, and if you haven’t yet, unlock some new features by creating an account (recommended).

And as always, don’t be shy: share your thoughts and feedback with us, either in the comment section below or by contacting us.

We hope this post was helpful to you.

Return to the Tickr home page.

Some companies need twenty minute videos to explain what they do. That’s cool. Tickr is so easy to explain though, that ours only lasts 56 seconds. Check it out:

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Questions about the Pro or Enterprise versions? Contact us.

Feel free to also visit our website and have a look around, and even play with our free trial version.