Archives for the month of: February, 2013

6e89ca3b2680041b003c8d519bde5f65

Filed under: and now, for something completely different… Don’t worry, this isn’t going to be an in-depth analysis of so-called case studies involving digital influencers, awareness campaigns and free swag. Just a few straightforward observations (maybe even insights) about this little-spoken-of confluence of fashion design and digital navel-gazing that the cynics among us might point out could very well be a sort of marriage made in heaven. While that’s neither here nor there, here’s what we got out of that information:

1. Leverage events.

Events like New York Fashion Week (and design houses participating in them) are now leveraging social media to increase their reach and penetrate markets. Case in point: Marc Jacobs gained over 5,000 new Twitter followers in one week by leveraging its digital presence during the fall event. Michael Kors gained an impressive 15,000 in the same time frame. Victoria Beckham (while not in Paris watching DB play for PSG) managed to gain 53,000 followers that week.

If your industry has big events, use them. It doesn’t matter if it’s CES, the Oscars or the Detroit auto show. Starting today, your business is going to have a digital/social media plan in place before you attend your industry events. Not taking advantage of this magnet for media coverage and attention borders on negligent.

2. Rethink the world of the catalog.

Badgley Mischka & Bergdorf Goodman, understanding the potential power of Pinterest (think demographics and layouts) previewed their new collection exclusively on the platform. The result: almost 40,000 net new followers for their Pinterest account, after posting only 42 items. Cost of printing: zero. Cost of mailing: zero. Cool factor: high. Virality quotient: high.

Well played.

3. Context is king.

Sometimes, a product is just a product. But anything that speaks to both an appreciation for original design and its owner/user’s sense of cultural identity is bound to be incorporated into someone’s photo feed. Enter Instagram. Whether you think the whole thing is an orgy of vanity or a cute little phase humanity is going through right now doesn’t matter. Fact is that people like to take pictures of themselves and of their stuff and post those pictures on Facebook and Instagram and wherever else they can. Some companies approach this with suspicion if not apprehension. Others embrace it completely. The fashion industry finds itself in a very unique position in regards to this whole cultural phenomenon because its entire existence is predicated upon people wanting to look good and be socially desirable. In other words, if Pinterest is a natural extension of the catalog, Instagram and Facebook are the natural extensions of people’s own private catwalks and red carpets. Some numbers:

Over 650,000 people follow Burberry’s Instagram account. 500,000 people follow Marc Jacobs’ Instagram account. Gucci: 350,000. Kate Spade: 300,000. And so on. You get the idea. And don’t cringe (especially you serious photographers out there) but 73 Instagram photos from New York Fashion Week were accepted into Getty Images’ library. Yes… times, they’re a-changin’. It isn’t a bad thing either: empowering people to share your products in a way that gives them both approval and context creates a free engine of discovery and recommendation. You want net new customers? You want to get people to covet your products and get off the fence about buying them? Well there you go.

4. Understand your key channels.

Sure, most of the channels you want to focus on are no-brainers: Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Pinterest, Instagram, and so on. But there might be some niche channels you need to leverage as well. For the fashion world right now, one of them seems to be Pose. The platform a) uses a user co-creation model to curate collections of “looks” that users can browse and b) integrates a shopping into the experience.

What’s the big deal? 1,000,000 users and 120 million images viewed per month.  How many people are opening your emails or taking time out of their day to come by your website?

Plant seeds in all the smart places. Not just where everyone else is planting theirs either. Plant them also in places where people come specifically to find the kind of stuff you want to sell.

5. Use infographics no matter what your industry is.

No need to go into lengthy explanations about this one. We would have probably never even heard of Pose had it not been for that infographic.

Lesson: It doesn’t matter if your business only sells peanut-shucking machines to the tabby aristocracy in the Democratic Republic of Catistan (yes, it’s… a real place): use infographics to help potential customers discover your company and your products.

6. Use hashtags.

One of several common denominator in all of those wins: the use of specific hashtags. Now, wait a minute… we know what you;re going to say: hashtags aren’t necessary or cool anymore. Well, half of that is just nonsense. While it’s true that they aren’t necessary for monitoring purposes, they are nonetheless helpful. Here are three reasons why: Identity, virality and measurement.

Identity: they provide context for social content. Virality: they’re social objects that invite participation and sharing. Measurement: necessary or not, they do make monitoring, measurement and reporting a little easier for your digital team. Using the attached infographic as an example, imagine how much of a pain it would be to effectively track every mention of New York Fashion Week without the #NYFW tag. By creating official hashtags, you help bring clarity and order to what might otherwise be an incoherent mess of social mentions.

7. Monitor digital channels for key activity.

Monitor and measure mentions, followers, comments, shares. Do this qualitatively and quantitatively. Measure that against visits to your websites, visits to your stores, impact on sales volume, brand awareness and brand sentiment. Use the proper tools. Use the proper methodology.  Treat this stuff like the job it is and not an afterthought. Treat social channels as the product discovery channels they are and strive to understand the mechanisms by which your social content and activity ultimately drives sales. It isn’t that hard, but it’s work and when you treat it like work, it pays off. Big time.

We hope that gave you some cool ideas to work on. And if our Command Center app can help, all the better. Big thanks to ebay deals  and Mashable for the infographic.

Cheers,

The Tickr team

PS: Feel free to join our growing digital community on Facebook and on Twitter and tell us what you think. (We won’t spam you. We promise.)

tickr_ipad_03_790

Yesterday, we introduced you to a handful of new features involving common data sources like Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr and Yelp! You guys seemed to like that, so we figured that we should also mention – for those of you who haven’t worked with the enterprise version of our product – that Tickr can be made to work with data from pretty much any source you want.

In other words, if news sites, blogs and social media feeds aren’t enough, you can feed Tickr whatever else you want to. It can be internal data like sales numbers and volume of phone calls into customer support. It can be marketing-specific metrics like share of voice, web traffic, conversions and  even Klout scores. You can basically plug anything you want into Tickr and plot it on a timeline.

Let’s look at three examples of what that looks like. First, here is a basic version of what a purely quantitative custom Tickr screen:

Tickr mockup 002

Note: the above example is just a mock-up to illustrate the functionality. The data isn’t real. You can also go watch a live version of it here so you see how it behaves. (Most of the tabs and links have been deactivated but you’ll get the idea.) The point is to help you visualize what Tickr can do outside of the standard functionality that you are probably used to. Think comparative analytics, data correlation, market intelligence, product line comparisons, competitor monitoring, and so on. Your imagination is the limit.

If you prefer a mix of qualitative and quantitative data, you can build your report to look more like this:

tickr mockup 003

You can go see the live version of that mock-up here. Same thing as before: the data isn’t real and some of the functionality has been turned off. It’s just an illustration of what Tickr can do with a mix of standard and custom data.

In this example, pay particular attention to the tab titled Correlation Score (in green). If you’ve ever tried to map ROI paths along a timeline, guess what: Tickr can do that. (Note: if you want to, we can talk about how to properly measure ROI in a future post. It’s an important topic and we can definitely help you with that too.)

The screenshot below looks a little more like the Tickr overview screen you are used to, but if you look carefully, you will notice that it is a quantitative/qualitative custom configuration that combines news, stocks, unit sales and Tweets along a common timeline. As always, the timeline is completely searchable.

tickr_ipad_10_790

If you are an executive team, a PR firm or a CEO working on a big announcement (like a major government contract, a much anticipated new product release, a major acquisition or a quarterly earnings report,) having the ability to simultaneously monitor mentions of your brand in the news and social channels and see in real time the impact that this event is having on leads, website visits, sales and even stock price, is pretty powerful. (Sorry… long sentence.) The point is that Tickr lets you do that. We’re a lot more than just a handy monitoring platform.

If you have any questions about any of this, don’t hesitate to contact our customer support team. If you don’t feel like being quite that formal, it’s okay to approach us on Facebook and on Twitter. That’s what we’re there for.

Until we chat again, we hope we’ve given you a lot to think about.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team.

*       *       *

While we have your attention, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest (going on right now):

The categories are non-profitjournalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a brief case study or summary of how you used Command Center before mid-March.

Make it as simple as you want. It doesn’t have to be fancy. The most creative and/or interesting case studies/summaries will win. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! So sign up here and have fun playing with Command Center.

 

A lot goes into building tools like Tickr’s Command Center. There’s a lot of tinkering going on, a lot of tweaking, a lot of getting under the hood and adding new and better stuff. In a way, we’re kind of like the wrench monkeys of the digital world: we spend all day tinkering in our digital garage, building badder, hotter, faster stuff. (By the way, you probably don’t want to wear white around our offices. Fair warning.)

Anyway, we spent all weekend supercharging the hot rod, and we’re pretty happy with the results. Here’s what’s new this week:

Twitter controls:  Until now, you could browse tweets in our timeline but not respond to them without first clicking on the source and accessing the actual tweet (in Twitter). We didn’t like the extra step, so we got rid of it. You can now reply, retweet or favorite a tweet directly from Tickr. Status: All users
Tickr new1
Flickr: You can now also add a Flickr source when creating a new Tickr page. Status: All users
Tickrnew2
Yelp! We can also add Yelp business locations, though for now, this feature is only configurable on the back end. We will let you know when this feature will be made available to everyone (hopefully soon). Status: Enterprise
Tickrnew3
Pinterest: We can follow Pinterest boards. Like Yelp!, this is only configurable on the back end for now, but we hope to change that soon. (One step at a time.) Note:  Tickr being mostly focused on monitoring and analytics, the beta currently only allows a user to follow a board, not to repin or like. We will let you know when we add additional functionality and when we make this feature available to all users. Status: Enterprise
We have a lot more exciting new releases scheduled for the next few weeks, so stay tuned and Tickr on.

*       *       *

While we have your attention, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest while you still can:

The categories are non-profit, journalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a brief case study or summary of how you used Command Center before mid-March.

Make it as simple as you want. It doesn’t have to be fancy. The most creative and/or interesting case studies/summaries will win. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! So sign up here and have fun playing with Command Center.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Well, what do you know, we just got a little bit of unexpected press, courtesy of How Magazine and designer Martin Oberhäuser, who has been pretty key in the development of Tickr since its inception. The terms you are looking for right now are complex information design and interface design. 

There’s probably an article about long-distance collaboration models begging to be written too, as Martin spends most of his time in Hamburg and we’re based in California.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Martin’s philosophy, in his own words, basically boils down to this: “Information is beautiful, and life without information is impossible. But it needs someone to filter the mass of information around us and turn it into something readable and usable.” We couldn’t agree more.

Check out Tickr screenshots featured in the March 2013 issue of How. (Insert happy faces here.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If Martin’s work seems familiar, it’s because he’s also worked on projects for IPG Mediabrands, Deutsche Telekom, Magna Global, Labbler, Brockhaus, Airbnb, Cisco, and Popular Mechanics. Unless you have been living under a rock, chances are that you have already seen his work outside of our little world of digital monitoring and mission control centers.

You can check out Martin’s beautiful portfolio here. And if you aren’t already reading HOW, you really should add it to your reading list. It’s been on ours for years. We’re suckers for anything that deals with design and design thinking. In case you were wondering, we’re also big fans of Fast Company, Inc., I.D., Print and Dwell.

*       *       *

While we have your attention, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest while you still can:

The categories are non-profit, journalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a brief case study or summary of how you used Command Center before mid-March.

It doesn’t have to be fancy. The most creative and/or interesting case studies/summaries will win. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! So sign up here and have fun playing with Command Center.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team

If you have been reading our blog these past few months, you have probably noticed that we spend a lot of time talking about digital mission control centers. Given that our product generally ends up being used in a digital mission control center setting and that most of our clients are engaged in some phase of either developing or expanding a digital mission control center, we are in a unique position to observe, discuss and provide insights on the inevitable adoption of digital mission control center by every agency and brand in the world inside of the next three years. This trend may have been accelerated by a single event which took place during the 2013 Superbowl.

A quick recap: Superbowl Sunday. The Baltimore Ravens are leading the San Francisco 49ers 28-6 with only 13:22 left in the third quarter. Suddenly,the NOLA Superdome experiences a power outage. Moments later, Oreo tweets this ad with the caption “Power out? No problem.”

Clever, right? Yeah, we thought so too.

The result:

Oreo tweets

The biggest boost in mentions and follows for any brand at the Superbowl. Compare that to any other Superbowl advertiser.

The same image received over 20,000 likes on Facebook, and the marketing, digital and advertising worlds were abuzz with Oreo and 360i’s marketing clever little guerrilla coup during the Superbowl.

Why is Twitter relevant to this conversation? Well… Judging by our own monitoring of the Superbowl, the lion’s share of brand mentions and real-time conversations about the Superbowl happened on Twitter:

Tickr Superbowl 2

This isn’t to say that Twitter is more valuable than Facebook or that social networks are more valuable to advertisers than traditional media channels like TV and radio. This isn’t that kind of post. What we are observing is that every channel has its own unique value, and when it comes to amplifying the impact of a particular event to promote a product or brand, Twitter tends to be a high volume, high reach, high velocity channel.

Look at it another way: what Oreo managed to do in under five minutes with a few computers and an agile social content team was both more effective and considerably cheaper than most multi-million advertising spots broadcast during the game (including its own). There were virtually no production costs involved. There was no media buy involved either. (Note: the average Superbowl ad was reported to have cost around $4M this year.)

Will this ultimately turn into more sales for Oreo and Kraft? Maybe. Maybe not. Only time will tell. You could ask the same question of any of Superbowl Sunday’s ads and the answer right now would be the same: we don’t know yet. All we know is that the impact of this one little piece of real-time marketing was a measurable win in terms of reach, in terms of social sharing, in terms of generating positive product and brand sentiment, in terms of positive brand engagement, and, last but not least, in terms of its overall cost. If anything, that’s a very good start.

So how did Oreo and 360i pull this off? Well, Buzzfeed’s Rachel Sanders has a quick recap of how this little win came to be:

“We had a mission control set up at our office with the brand and 360i, and when the blackout happened, the team looked at it as an opportunity,” agency president Sarah Hofstetter told BuzzFeed. “Because the brand team was there, it was easy to get approvals and get it up in minutes.”

Wait… 360i had a what where? A “mission control center?” Set up at the office? You don’t say.

This is the part where we sit back in our awesome 100% recyclable ergonomic chairs, cross our spectacularly muscular arms, and smirk at you without actually saying “we told you so.”

Bonus: digital mission control centers don’t have to cost anywhere near $4M either.

To be fair, there is a lot more that went into this win than a mission control center: a leadership team brave enough to give its digital, brand and agency teams the go-ahead to build a clever social engagement campaign (remember Oreo’s “Daily Twist”), the right digital team to execute on that plan, the right collaboration processes, the right resources, the right tools, and the right environment. You need it all. But it is no accident that the first thing that came up in the Buzzfeed interview was the mission control piece of the puzzle. Having one has become a tactical imperative. It’s as simple as that.

Our guess is that every brand and agency who had a “we wish we had thought of that” moment on Monday morning is now looking into finally building something similar to what 360i and other forward-thinking agencies already had in place for the big game. This is how digital marketing is done now.

Every evolutionary leap needs a catalyst. We all just witnessed one. Cool, huh?

Other screen shots from our Command Center‘s Superbowl monitoring adventures:

Tickr Superbowl 4

Tickr Superbowl 7

If you are new to this topic, we invite you to do a quick search for some of the articles we have already posted here on the topic of digital mission control centers (how they work, why they matter, how to integrate them into your business, how to use them to track campaigns and/or PR crises, etc.) and of course find out why most of them already incorporate Tickr. You’ll want to use other tools as well, by the way. We’re only one small piece of the puzzle.

(If you aren’t familiar with our new Command Center edition, here is a 1 minute video that touches on the basics.)

*       *       *

Also, be sure to enter our Command Center beta/contest:

The categories: non-profit, journalism, and for-profit.

The way it works is simple: 1) Sign up. 2) Enjoy free access to Command Center. 3) Submit a case study (or summary) of how Command Center helped you with a project. That’s it. We even have prizes and everything! The sooner you register, the better. (Sign up here.)

Cheers,

The Tickr Team