Archives for posts with tag: digital control center

Let’s say that you are a brand manager, an agency working with a brand, a journalist following a brand (or just an ardent fan of a brand,) and you need to know what is being said about that brand, where it is being said, by whom, and when. Obviously, Tickr takes care of that for you, but let’s look at how easy it is to use.

Let’s start by building a simple brand page in the basic trial version. For the purposes of this post, let’s pick Nike (iconic brand, lots of content, and Nike was in the news this week because of rumors of its new shoe’s pricing and the Lance Armstrong decision).

By now, you’ve created an accountlogged in, and you’ve built your page by just typing “Nike” in the box. If you haven’t done that yet, start here.

After a few seconds, here is what your basic Tickr page for Nike should basically look like:

First, let’s get situated. Top left of your screen is your page tab. (See below.) If you are using the free trial version, you only get one page at a time. If you have signed up for the pro version, you can have several tabs per page. So what you could do there is do comparative analysis of say Nike vs. Adidas, or deeper analysis of the Nike brand by refining your use of keywords. For instance: Nike, Nike Football, Nike Soccer, Nike Shoes, Nike retail, etc.

Next, look to the top right of your screen. (See below.) Though when your page launches, it will default to automatic scrolling, you can switch to manual scrolling, either by clicking on the up and down arrows or the on/off button. Your choice.

You can also easily share your page with friends and colleagues, edit your page, and there is also a help page that will help you navigate all of the elements of the page in case you have forgotten how to do something.

Now let’s look at the content being displayed on the page.

As you can see, each source of data is clearly displayed and color-coded so your eyes can easily discern between blogs, news, Twitter, Facebook, etc.

Here is how each source timeline further breaks down: the boxes of text and the images you see at the top of each timeline are called content windows. They are there to give you a sense for what kind of content is being shared and create context.

The gray blocks below the content windows make up the activity graph. You can interact with all of these elements at any time just by clicking on them. (See below.)

So for instance, if you click on the blogs feed’s content window featuring the “Just Do It – Four Steps to Filmmaking,” you can pre-select it. In the top right of that window is a little symbol with a box and an arrow. Click on it and you will access the page that the original content came from. (See below.)

In that particular instance, the link took me to Garrett Robinson’s blog (hi Garrett), where I can read the full post.  (See below.)

Now, if I were a community manager for Nike, I might decide to do nothing with that information… or I might reach out to Garrett and thank him for the mention, or make Nike resources available to him, or decide to share his content on a community blog, Facebook page or via Twitter. The options will vary depending on your role, your objectives, the opportunities and risks presenting themselves, but the point is that this feature allows you to go beyond simple content discovery. It allows you to drill down into stories, mentions and content, explore them fully, and interact with them at will.

What about the activity graph? Same thing. Click on any bar you want, and you will be able to drill down into a summary of the activity for that time frame. (See below.)

Once the window for that time frame is open, you can scroll up and down (or move to the previous time frame or the next without having to close the window, which is kind of handy).

Top right of each item in the summary window is a hyperlink, allowing you to go straight to the source if you want to. Same as with the content window. The feature also works with the Flickr feed:

See? Super easy.

On the macro level, a Tickr page works as a visual ticker that aggregates then organizes data from a breadth of relevant sources. Dedicate a screen to it in your office, lobby or digital mission control center, and you will immediately get a sense for the volume of conversations and mentions going on about your brand, what category of channels these conversations and mentions are taking place on, and what the nature of these conversations and mentions is. The page’s design and automated updates can therefore alert you to shifts in attention, to the impact of breaking stories, the possibility of looming PR crises, the effectiveness of a campaign, the stickiness of a message, etc. (We’ll get into those and more in upcoming posts.)

On a micro level, the ability to drill down into the content summaries then track mentions directly back to their source 1. allows you to understand then analyze mentions and conversations, 2. choose who you want to interact with and where, and 3. gives you complete control over the degree of engagement you want to have with your audience and/or community.

Combining Tickr’s macro and micro capabilities makes for a pretty powerful social media monitoring and management tool.

We’ll focus on more advanced features in future posts, so stay tuned. (There’s a lot more to talk about.)

In the meantime, feel free to try Tickr’s free trial version, and if you haven’t yet, unlock some new features by creating an account (recommended if you want richer results and want to be able to build pages with more than one tab/keyword at a time).

And as always, don’t be shy: share your thoughts and feedback with us, either in the comment section below or by contacting us.

We hope this post was helpful to you.

Return to the Tickr home page.

We recently touched on the topic of purpose vs. shiny object syndrome, so let’s dive a little deeper into that today by looking into data and insights. This will eventually evolve into a practical discussion about the difference between monitoring, measurement and analysis, so think of this as a small part of a bigger whole.

Let’s start at the beginning. The point of collecting data in the first place is twofold:

1. Funnel certain types of information to the right people and departments in real time (customers requiring immediate assistance, sales leads, the first phase of a potential PR crisis, etc.) and trigger a response.

2.  Derive insights from data obtained from consumers.

We can talk about the response piece of this discussion in an upcoming post. For now, let’s focus on the insights part of it.

Simply put, the building blocks of insights are data, and insights are the building blocks of business decisions. The core equation you want to hitch your strategy wagon to is this: good data + good insights = good decisions.

Easier said than done, sure, but you have to start somewhere. (Ideally, the people in your organization tasked with translating data into insights and strategy are both competent and intellectually agile. For the sake of this discussion, let’s assume that they are.) As a CTO (chief technology officer) or CIO (Chief intelligence/information officer), your job in building a digital control center, no matter who ends up owning, running, and sharing it, is to equip the insights folks with the best data collection, management and communication ecosystem possible.

Aside from the response functions we mentioned earlier (tech support, customer service, community management, sales and PR), the driving force behind the design of that ecosystem must be to provide analysts and decision-makers with everything they need to quickly derive the clearest and most inspired insights from what would otherwise be endless oceans of data. A short list of the process you should focus on in choosing your monitoring and management software and designing your display structure would look like this:

Acquire Data (what channels & sources)

Filter Data (separate signal from noise)

Translate Data (format and clarify data)

You could collect data all day long, amass mountains of it, and still not have what you need to derive useful insights or draw helpful conclusions about the effectiveness of an activity (or of your overall business performance). So you have to know what data you want to collect and why, then figure out where and how to collect it. For all the bells, whistles and amazing displays one might expect to find in a digital control center, the primary purpose of that array of screens and keyboards is to properly acquire, funnel and manage data for customer-facing employees and decision-makers.

The selection of each monitoring tool assigned to this piece of your digital practice must be driven by an understanding of what kind of data are most valuable to each key function and why, where they can be collected, how quickly and how reliably. The tools you select must give you the ability to organize, manage and present that data in ways that make that data actionable. Simple, right? In theory. In practice, it takes a good deal of planning, testing and analysis to get this right. It isn’t hard, but it takes work. So don’t rush into investing into cookie-cutter digital control center solutions. Make sure that you build the right ecosystem for you. Make each screen count. Build best practices and functional workflows around your control center.  It might seem like a little more work than you expected to do on the front end, but it will be well worth it in a few months when your data and insights ecosystem is humming along like a well-oiled machine.

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As always, we welcome your comments here, on Facebook and on Twitter. And if you haven’t tried Tickr alongside your other digital/social monitoring solutions, you’re about twenty seconds away from a test drive. Just click here.