Archives for posts with tag: infographic

If we spend a lot of time talking about the need to use social media for market research, it’s because a lot of what we do revolves around that. Like most monitoring tools, Tickr is a pretty handy companion to Google when it comes to studying keyword  trends, digging up brand mentions, capturing consumer insights, and so on. You’ve seen our multi-channel dashboard. It’s simple. Today, let’s look at some numbers relating to businesses incorporating social media into their market research, courtesy of Social Media Examiner and Mediabistro.

First things first: Remember how in our last post, the study we shared with you suggested that increasing brand exposure and increasing traffic to a website were among the top goals of social media programs? We run into the same theme here, with 85% and 69% of respondents identifying them as the top two most valuable benefits of social media. Marketplace insights came in at number three (65%). We were also pretty excited to see lead generation and developing loyalty rounding out the top five.

Unfortunately, the report also tells us that almost half of B2C companies still don’t use social media for marketplace intelligence. (59% for B2C and 68% for B2B.) That’s shocking. Remember what we said in our last post about too many companies still chasing the wrong goals and not understanding how social fits into their business model? We see that reflected clearly in these two numbers.

The rest of the infographic isn’t super helpful, unfortunately, so let’s talk about some of the types of market intelligence a monitoring tool can help you with:

1. Tracking keywords (including hashtags) can help you track a campaign’s reach, stickiness and demos across demos, channels and regions. The same principle works for product releases, press releases, event awareness, etc.

2. Monitoring changes in sentiment and changes in the use and frequency of specific keyword combinations can help you graph consumer perceptions of a brand or product.

3.  Looking for sudden spike in mentions of your brand or product could signal a looming PR crisis. Use monitoring software as an early warning system.

4. Monitoring for mentions of your brand or products will alert you to customer service opportunities in real time. Airlines, cable providers, hotels and retailers are already using channels like Twitter and Facebook to respond to customer service issues in real time. Benefit: Reduces customer erosion, increases customer loyalty, increases the chances of positive WOM, positive PR, cost efficient alternative to call centers.

 5. Monitoring for mentions of your brand and key product categories will alert you to consumers considering a purchase. Weigh in and you could tip the scales in your favor.

6. Add a geolocation feature to your monitoring tools, and you will be able to map all of the above. What does that mean? More localized targeting of campaigns, responses and community engagement, for starters. You can see if a PR problem is limited to certain geographical area, connect a potential customer to the sales team closest to them, or identify areas of the country (or the world) where your latest campaign isn’t hitting the right notes.

(Above: You aren’t dreaming. That image is a sneak peek at one of the new screens available in Tickr‘s soon-to-be-released Command Center suite. And yes, we’re bringing map functionality to you guys this year. That’s all we can say for now, but… you spoke, we listened, and… you’re welcome.)

Anyway, knowing what we know, the fact that 59% of B2C companies report not using social media for marketplace intelligence really bothers us. We get the content publishing piece, but… all that talking without really listening? That’s an ocean of opportunities not even being tapped, right there. Given that real-time intelligence has a direct impact on marketing reach, net new sales, brand perception, customer loyalty and a slew of other business-relevant points of focus, we want to help change that this year. If we accomplish one thing, let it be that.

We’ll be back soon with more.

Cheers,

The Tickr team

PS: As always, we invite you to like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and of course try Tickr (it only takes a few seconds to create an account).

Today, we want to point you to one of this year’s top resources about the state of media (and one you should bookmark) – Nielsen’s State of Media: The Social Media Report 2012. There’s no need for us to peel back the layers and outline every piece of it, but we do want to point out a few key findings before you guys spend some quality time with the report itself.

1. Compare the amount of time spent on social media by device category: PC vs. mobile/tablet. On average, mobile web & apps win out over PC. That is pretty significant when you consider where web development, advertising dollars and marketing campaigns will go in 2013 and beyond. We have passed the tipping point: the PC is now the “old” interface. Mobile devices have overtaken the PC when it comes to digital social usage.

 2. Year over year, unique users of the mobile web has almost doubled in the US. (82% increase.) Mobile app users have also increased by 85%. PC web users, however, have gone down a bit (4%). Something about these numbers remind us of other media tipping points we’ve seen in the last few years.

To make this data relevant to you, let’s focus on a few quick questions: where are your customers? How are they accessing the web? How much time are they spending there? (How much time are they spending there compared to “traditional” media, and how will this impact where you focus your resources and budgets?) What kinds of experiences are they expecting? What are they talking about? What does this all mean to your business?

 

3. Year over year, US web users spent 120% more time accessing digital content through apps than a year ago vs. +4% via the good old PC. But wait… when you look at net numbers, the lion’s share of minutes spent accessing web content the PC still dominates: 363 billion minutes (PC) vs. 158 billion minutes on mobile web and mobile apps combined.

So here, think trends vs. volume. Be aware of the shift, but be also be aware that the good old PC-based web is far from dead. Plan for mobile, plan for apps, invest your money there, but don’t abandon the non-mobile web just yet. Think “and” rather than “or.” Think combination rather than replacement.

 4. Social TV: look into it. How this ties into advertising, reach, WOM, net promoter score and customer acquisition isn’t super complicated.

Also, from January to June 2012, active Twitter users discussing or sharing updates about TV content grew from 26% to 33%. Whether you are a media buyer or a social media director looking to justify your budget, this trend is worth keeping an eye on. If it inspires you to use social media to drive the reach of your television content (including advertising), you’re on the right track.

How can social channels and social sharing increase reach and amplify the reach of your content? How can these same mechanisms help customers discover your products or move them up into their hierarchy of planned purchases? How might you leverage monitoring platforms to better understand these mechanisms and tie them into customer acquisition, development and retention strategies?

(If you weren’t yet asking these questions, you should be.)

5. “Second-screen” is actually a little more complex than what has been presented to your team, but that’s a good thing. Here is a quick breakdown of what people actually do on the web while they are watching television content (and how they do it):

- Shopping (45% on tablets)

- Looking up product or special promotion information (TV ad related; 50% on tablets)

- Visiting social networks (44% on tablets)

- Doing research on the show they are watching (35% on tablets).

Takeway 1: Immediate calls to action work. If you are buying ads on TV (or working with product placement strategies), make sure that your digital storefront and/or digital springboard towards an offline purchase is a) easy to find, b) easy to share, and c) built to drive the user behaviors you expect it to drive.

Takeway 2: Tablets trump phones when it comes to second screen experiences. Design your digital marketing platforms accordingly:

1. Build deliberate second screen experiences.

2. Design one-click tie-ins to product pages, social channels and other relevant content.

Takeaway 3: If you plan on paying for TV content in 2013 (advertising or actual programming), you’re going to need to include a second-screen plan to go along with it. Not doing this is basically the equivalent of posting a phone number in an ad but not having someone to answer the phone if someone tries to call. Relying on people to Google your product, your TV program or your company worked great in 2010. You can’t really just rely on that anymore.

Note: Your second screen experience should include a) social components (sharing, #hashtags, links to Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and b) transaction driver components (links to product feature pages, customer reviews, online stores, and brick & mortar store websites).

Okay, that’s it for us. Big thanks to Nielsen and NM Insights for putting this together. Reports like this one tend to help companies make better digital spend decisions, so that’s a huge + in our book. For that, it goes at the top of our 2012 studies bookmarks. Great stuff. We hope it will help you with 2013 planning.

To check out the full report, go here.

To return to Tickr.com, click here.

Cheers,

The Tickr team.

Eloqua recently published the above infographic to highlight certain key elements of a study they conducted with B2B companies in regards to social media. We gloss through our share of data and infographics here at Tickr, but this one caught our eye for several reasons. The first is that it focuses on B2B, and that is always a plus in our book. Most of the studies being done on social business focus on B2C organizations, and folks who work in B2B tend to get the short end of the stick when it comes to running into solid case studies and informative data about social business in B2B. So before we go any further, let’s give Eloqua a hand for doing this. (And doing it well.)

Second, the study doesn’t stick to just asking the usual questions. It manages to dig a little further than most and get to actionable insights. That’s what we like to see. (data is nice, but if you can’t really use it to do something better, faster, cheaper or smarter, what’s the point?) The first thing that caught our eye wasn’t that 34% of B2B companies STILL don’t use social media or that 83% of social media use is aimed at “increasing awareness.” (We’ll come back to that.) No, what first caught our attention was this: 26% of respondents said PR/communications owned social and 11% said the web team owned it. Remove that 37% of PR/Communications/Web, and you’re left with 63% of something else. Though the report states that only 23% of companies surveyed stated that social is being shared by departments, our hunch is that the number is far higher than that. This is good news.

Even if that 23% number is accurate, it means that the trend towards operationalizing social media usage across the organization is moving in the right direction. The days of social business really meaning “social marketing” are coming to an end. Organizations are learning and adapting to the reality of social business: Since it can be used for lead generation, business development, market research, PR, Marketing, user community management, etc., the management of the company’s social accounts has to be shared across departments. This is indicative of a natural evolution in the B2B social business space. Organizations are learning and adapting to these new channels and technologies. That is a very good sign.

The second thing that caught our eye was the fact that only 35% of organizations are currently using social media for lead/demand generation. 12% responded that they don’t know. That leaves 53% of companies not using social media for lead generation. Given the connective nature of social channels (and for B2B, we want to stress the importance of channels like LinkedIn), we found that surprising. Eloqua looked a little closer at this issue and found that 43% of B2B companies do not currently have a social media-friendly demand generation strategy in place.

43%.

33% of these same companies seemed to be unsure that social media can even be used for demand generation, and 25% responded that social media is simply not applicable to a demand generation funnel. 18% went as far as to say that they don’t have the tools.

These numbers surprised us. Why? Because 100% of B2B companies that currently use social media should be focusing their social media efforts on demand generation. And the 34% of companies that don’t should be looking into figuring out how to incorporate social channels into a demand generation model. So why is this not happening?

The clue might come from one of the first things we talked about today: 83% of the focus from B2B companies in social media is to “raise awareness” for the company or brand. In the same vein, 56% drive social sharing (to further grow that awareness). 55% focus on growing followers and likes, believing that this will increase trust in their brand.

Only 32% are using social channels as demand generation channels (although 35% responded that they are using social media for demand generation).

This tells us that when it comes to social media, B2B organizations are a) still focusing on the wrong things, and b) not leveraging social channels properly. If awareness is the focus of their activity but demand generation isn’t, they are still mostly doing marketing and PR on social channels. They are not truly engaged in building social business practices yet.

Another hint might come from the Top 3 channels part of the graphic, which tells us that 80% use Facebook and 78% use Twitter, but only 51% use LinkedIn. (Eloqua reminds us that LinkedIn has been shown to be 3x more effective at lead generation than Facebook or Twitter, so the impact of this slow adoption rate is compounded by that difference in effectiveness between channels.)

We will revisit the topic of lead/demand generation in a more “how to” format, but for now, here are a few quick takeaways:

1. If you have not yet incorporated social activity into your organization’s lead/demand generation mechanisms, you need to change that right away. Especially if you expect to be able to have a legitimate ROI discussion with the CFO or your sales managers at some point.

2. Use monitoring tools to listen for mentions of your brand, your competitors’ brands, your products, their products, and any keyword that is relevant to your category. Do this on as many social channels as possible. Listening for these mentions will open up a world of opportunities for you, ranging from market intelligence to (yes, you guessed it…) lead generation. This is how you will discover user communities, associations and discussion groups made up of people you need to be engaging with, and leave you open to product feature ideas you had not yet considered (to gain a market advantage) and possible partnerships that were not until then on your radar. (Distributors, manufacturers, service providers, OEM partners, new resellers, etc.)

3. Focus less on marketing and building awareness on social channels, and more on identifying opportunities to make meaningful connections with people and organizations whom you can have a mutually beneficial relationship with. Again, these may be new customers, sure, (though advertising and marketing may be more effective means of increasing your reach than social activity) but don’t underestimate the impact of connecting with existing distribution, manufacturing, reseller, technical and user communities. Find them and join them. Then use these communities to further connect people to each other (and your products). That is where the true value of your social activities lie, and where the seeds of true demand generation will take root.

4. Whether or not a B2B organization ends up using tools like the ones offered by Eloqua (by the way, how would you rate their use of social sharing to drive awareness and demand generation? See what they did there?), the opportunity to build a digital mission control center around a digital monitoring + brand awareness + demand generation + sales & conversion measurement practice might serve a B2B organization far better than… just having a Facebook and Twitter “awareness” strategy.

 Focus on the right things. Rethink your use of social media channels. Look beyond awareness. What is that awareness supposed to drive? Business. What kind of business? New business and existing business. Is your content driving demand? Are your interactions with people on social channels driving demand? Are your monitoring, response and engagement activities focused on driving business? If the answers to the last 3 questions aren’t “yes,” it’s time for a quick reboot of your social media program and get it back on the right track.

We’ll be back with more. In the meantime, why not check out the free version of our Tickr monitoring tool? If you weren’t yet monitoring with purpose, or if your monitoring tools left you a little confused, ours might make things easier and clearer for you. Let us know what you think.

Cheers,

The Tickr team.

by Olivier Blanchard

As the year ends and you start to meet internally to discuss next year’s planning, it might not be a bad idea to think about the changes already underway when it comes to media consumption, channel erosion, technology shifts, and what this all means to your business. Hopefully, this post will help you make smart decisions about where to focus your attention, efforts and funding in the next 12-18 months. No need for us to write a white paper on what it all means. We want to give you the information you need without saddling you with filler, so expect some bullets and key takeaways, but the graphics we have selected should speak for themselves. Pay attention and you should be able to connect the dots all on your own.

Let’s start with the graphic at the top of this post: Global Media Consumption per week 1900-2020. What do you see?

1. The main line: Global media consumption doubles every 25 years or so. Bear in mind that there are only 24 hours in a day, so that curve eventually levels off (even with second and third screens… but we won’t get into that today).

2. The nature of media is changing: 5 years ago, 50% of media was digital. In 8 years, that ratio will be 80%. Think about that and what it means.

3. Individual performance of specific media:

Print is steadily shrinking and has been since the 1940s, contrary to popular lore about the internet killing print. This is not a new phenomenon. It’s accelerating, sure, but it isn’t new. TV started that trend long before most of us were born.

Analog TV and radio formats have been replaced by digital formats. Radio has been relatively flat for a very long time. TV saw enormous growth from 1940 to 1980 but has been relatively flat ever since. Note that this graph doesn’t look at the growth of channels (channel proliferation and fragmentation, but consumption only. Adding 100 new TV and radio channels per day wouldn’t affect consumption).

Outdoor has been relatively flat for over a decade, as has been cinema.

So what’s growing? You already know: Internet, mobile (wireless) and games.

Speaking of mobile:

What this graph tells us:

Mobile cellular subscriptions are steadily increasing worldwide each year, as is the number of internet users. Active mobile broadband subscriptions are also growing quickly. That’s the black bar on the graph. It isn’t even there in 2006 but by 2010, it already reaches about 1 billion.

What’s flat (or close to flat?) Fixed broadband subscriptions and fixed telephone lines.

What does this graph show us?

1. Look at the relationship between internet users (green) vs. Fixed broadband subscriptions. What do you see? There are far more internet users than broadband subscriptions. Part of the reason for that is that one broadband subscription may serve an entire household or office, but there is more to it than that: Mobile broadband. More and more people now access the web through mobile devices. It isn’t to say that PCs are dead, but this indicates a pretty key shift in how people (it’s okay to call ourselves consumers) now access content and information.

2. Look at the relationship between fixed and mobile broadband (pink and black, respectively). In 2006, fixed broadband was it. By 2008, they were essentially tied. By 2011, mobile broadband was double the size of fixed broadband.

Bear in mind: Mobile broadband subscription = 1 user. Fixed broadband = several users. It’s simple math. Regardless of the apples to oranges comparison, growth is growth. Shift is shift. 75% of media will be digital in just 4 years. 80% of it will be digital in 8 years. Mobile devices are becoming the interfaces of choice for digital content. If you aren’t building your business processes and designing your content with this in mind, don’t blame “the economy” for what is about to happen to your market share.

Now let’s look at a quick graph on the relationship between age and internet use in developing economies vs. developed economies:

 Now look at this:

See the change in just 5 years?

Here’s another one that should make you think a bit, especially if your company has a global footprint:

Three things:

1. Globally, 45% of internet users (regardless of the interface) are under the age of 25. Though it may be obvious to most of you, don’t take for granted that every CEO and CMO has figured this out yet: It doesn’t matter if your typical customer is mostly over the age of 35. In 10 years, those 25-year-olds will be potential customers and they will expect you to do business the way they want you to do business. Better start working on them now. And while you’re at it, better start working on bringing every aspect of your business and its marketing/communications up to speed. You wouldn’t believe how many senior executives completely miss this.

2. Developing economies have some catching up to do when it comes to internet use, but they are quickly closing the gap.

3. Look at the growth of 3G penetration between 2009 and 2014: From 39% to 92% in Western Europe. From 9% to 40% in Eastern Europe. From 38% to 74% in North America. Japan hits 100% two years from now. 100%. (Japan is the model, by the way.) Even developing regions like Africa, the middle East and AsiaPac (minus Japan) are quadrupling 3G mobile penetration in the next two years. We are moving towards 80% of all media being digital. Mobile devices are increasingly becoming the digital interface of choice for consumers. Connect the dots.

Here’s a thought if you still don’t understand how this applies to your business: Follow the money. If it isn’t clear why any of this matters or even where things are going, look no further than shifts in advertising budgets in relation to digital and other media:

What do you see? Ad spend is flat in print (actually shrinking a bit) while digital ad spend is steadily growing. Every graph that compares online ad spend to other types of media ad spend look basically like this. If you don’t understand why this is happening, the graphs further up the page will help connect the dots.

Here’s another graph that ought to make you think about how your media planning strategy should already be shifting:

 What this graph shows is the point where online video wins the attention war and TV begins to recede. Same content but different interface, different medium, different level of user control. 2019 will be here before you know it. (The graph may even err on the side of caution. Things might already be moving faster.) What are you doing today to prepare for the television set’s Waterloo? From media buying to content production and distribution, are you sitting on your hands talking to analysts about future trends or are you staffing up with people who understand this and know how to prepare you for it?

Just as importantly, how are you restructuring your market research and consumer insights programs? (Are you? You should be.) This might help.

Let’s continue with today’s #graphfest. This ought to shed some light on what is happening on the interface front:

The 411: Desktop PCs are flat and mobile PCs (laptops) are growing. No surprise there. Also no surprise as to the growth of smart phones and tablets. But check this out:

Smart phones sales overtook desktop PC sales in 2008 and will take over mobile PC (laptop) sales in 2013. That’s next year.

Tablet sales will overtake desktop PC sales (that boxy thing taking up space in your employees’ cubicles) next year.

If you are an executive, go for a walk around your offices and ask yourself: What decade are you operating in? In fact… What century are you operating in? Look at your business processes, internal collaboration, media planning and productivity. Go spend a day at a media conference or tour your local coffee shops. Ask yourself if your business is operating in a bubble or if it is as technologically and strategically competitive as it could be. Be honest with yourself. Tip: If the average twenty-something hipster lounging around at Starbucks is better equipped than your average middle manager or business development team, the answer is no. Here’s another one: If your business isn’t creating apps or content specifically designed for these new devices (let alone social channels), the answer is also categorically no.

Every time you spy an executive working on a presentation on a plane, look at what kind of tech they use. Every time you see one using a boxy old laptop, you know the organization he or she works for is already falling behind. Why are these folks still using 2007 technology in 2012? You don’t see five year old tech winning on the racetrack, the field, the court or the links, right? Business is no different from sports in that regard: Outdated technology doesn’t give anyone an advantage. All it does is make you less competitive. Get unstuck.

Here’s a thought: When the world is changing faster than you are adapting to that change, it’s time to start a) worrying, and b) doing something about it. The idea isn’t even to eventually catch up, mind you. That’s a defensive position, a survival position. The idea is to actually get ahead of that change. That’s where the real competitive advantage is. Survival is a nice default position, sure; many businesses aren’t even there. But with only maybe 5% more thought and work than it would take to just play catch-up, you can shift from being just an “also in” company to becoming the leader in your industry or category inside of 5 years. That sort of surge in competitiveness doesn’t happen by accident. It takes will, foresight and initiative. That takes leadership. Real leadership. And sorry to have to tell you this, but real leaders make it a point to know what matters. “I don’t understand this new digital stuff” isn’t going to cut it anymore. Not understanding how things work anymore isn’t a sign of leadership. It’s an urgent call to action. Learn this stuff. Get caught up. It isn’t that difficult, and yes, we can help.

One last little media-related graphic to close today’s post and help you get your bearings:

Something else to think about: Becoming more “social” is only part of the shift that is taking place in media. It’s important, vital even, but without understanding how media as a whole is evolving, being “more social” probably won’t do most companies a whole lot of good. We’re seeing that already. There is a much bigger field, and the more of that field you and your senior leadership see, the better equipped you will be to not only survive the next decade but come out of it stronger and more competitive than ever. That’s the goal, right?

Final thoughts:

Don’t forget to plan beyond next quarter and/or year.

Get IT more involved in the day to day discussions that affect your business.

Rethink your hiring requirements.

Rethink the way you conduct market research.

Rethink the channels you use to connect with customers.

Rethink your relationship with consumers.

You aren’t necessarily going to become a digital business, but your business does need to be as effective in the digital space as it is everywhere else.

Welcome to the great reshuffling of the Fortune 5000 world.

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