Archives for category: Social Business

PRESS RELEASE: Tickr.com, the leading provider of real-time cloud-based business visualization, has launched Tickr Command Center, available starting today.

“With a powerful new feature set, Command Center enables clearer insights and better decisions, while maintaining our commitment to building products that are smart, simple, and well-designed,” said Tyler Peppel, Tickr Founder and CEO.

Command Center unifies business data from marketing, social media, and finance into one easy-to-use interface. Tickr customers include global leaders in consumer products, banking and finance, and telecommunications. “Our customers constantly surprise us with new ways to use Tickr, and their input was essential driver of this new release,” said Peppel.

“Our growth in 2013 is driven by growing demand for a single, integrated platform to present all kinds of business information,” said Tim Williams, VP Professional Services and Support at Tickr. “As managers look for a way to keep up with a rising tide of social, marketing, and financial data, Tickr offers them a powerful, intuitive application designed specifically to meet their needs.”

New Command Center features include:

Geotargeted Mapping

See events mapped geographically to assess global impact — marketing campaigns, sales, social media response can all be seen in a dynamic worldview and filtered to reflect targeted queries. Zoom in to target territories and compare events across geographies.

Impact by Channel

Compare impact of various initiatives by channel, at a glance, then shift marketing and communication resources to maximize impact and ROI. Gain insight into how resources are deployed as events happen in real-time. Events measured can be sales, social media mentions, and audience response to campaigns, polls, and contests.

Self-Service UI

Command Center brings a consumer-style UI to a sophisticated enterprise software platform, and made set-up and configuration incredibly simple. Adding a new topic takes less than a minute, with no training or technical skill required. This means you can respond immediately when there is a sudden need to track business topics and events as they occur in real-time.

Complex Queries

More and more business data sources are supporting queries that allow you to combine words and phrases using the words AND, OR, and NOT (otherwise known as Boolean operators) to limit, widen, or define the events and topics you are tracking. Command Center takes advantage of this capability, and enables query editing directly in the interface.

Command Center: Mastering the Data-Driven business

Business have always been data-driven, but today’s business has access to an unprecedented amount of digital data:

   -- key business metrics 

   -- social media activity on your brand and competitors 

   -- news, blog and comment mentions 

   -- sales activity 

   -- web traffic 

   -- sentiment about products, people and brands 

   -- digital advertising performance

This information exists in scattered and diverse locations: internal databases, cloud services, enterprise reporting systems, web metrics, social media platforms and CRM systems.

Getting even a partial picture of an area of the business requires logging in to multiple information sources, collecting the data, formatting it into a coherent presentation, and producing a report — which is usually outdated by the time it is produced. The process is labor-intensive, time-consuming, and must be repeated again for every reporting period.

Tickr brings it all your business information together into one, simple, easy to use interface. Command Center connects your social reporting and overall online presence with your business data, making it obvious how one affects the other. No other platform provides this simple, visual integration of wide-ranging data sources, resulting in a real-time holistic view of your brand and business.

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130528-908066.html

With 13 million views in one week on YouTube, kmart’s “Ship my Pants” catchphrase caught on fast.  It was a successful experiment in social listening, allowing the kmart marketing team to see wether or not they were on to something before moving to more traditional channels like print and television.

With a dedicated in-house, data-driven, social media team, they closely monitored reaction to the spot…You put things online, you get reaction, you get real-time feedback and data, and then you can make the decision on how big and bright you want to go with it.

Due to the campaigns success, kmart has plans to use similar tactics with their back-to-school campaign.  Read more: http://www.fastcocreate.com/1682826/how-kmart-used-social-listening-and-some-nerve-to-create-a-ship-my-pants-funny-viral-hitkmart

The Burson-Marsteller Global Social Media Check-Up examines the Fortune Global 100’s use of popular social networking platforms including: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and, for the first time, Google Plus and Pinterest.

Fortune Global 100 companies were mentioned more than 10,000,000 times in one month with Twitter being the major conversation driver.  With more than 340 million tweets a day, 72 hours of video posted a minute, and 901 million Facebook users there is no denying that social media is becoming increasingly important to companies and consumers.

Gone are the days when companies could sort through and tally all of their media mentions each morning.

Read More: http://www.slideshare.net/BMGlobalNews/b-m-global-social-media-checkup-2012-deck-13341217

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

With newly clarified rules from the SEC allowing companies to disclose financial information via social media, more and more companies are starting to take advantage of the opportunity to circulate materials through social.  However, some companies are more hesitant.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/04/25/businesses-take-a-wary-approach-to-disclosures-using-social-media/

Whether your company is just starting to dabble in social media or has a strong strategy it has been implementing for a while, you may want to know how other companies are navigating the social Web. Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/226338#ixzz2QZBvCsQF

how-organizations-structure-social-media-teams

Despite growth in small business appreciation for social media and rapid increase in belief in its effectiveness, small business are still unclear on how to leverage these new channels.

“More than half (54 percent) chose social media marketing as the marketing activity they need the most help with, which might explain why their frequency of use with social media is not where it needs to be.”

Tickr can help answer this need. With a straightforward GUI and easy-to-read interface, Ticker provides businesses with effective monitoring of all social networks.
Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

SHOULD SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY COST YOU YOUR JOB?  Tickr enables you to monitor external comments as well as activity on company-owned social accounts. The question then becomes: what crosses the line in terms of employee behavior? This excellent New York times discussion covers the bases:

http://http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/04/02/should-social-media-activity-cost-you-your-job/

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Hat tip to Kiss metrics for putting together this clear and concise infographic about mobile’s impact on B2C commerce in 2012 and near future.

Here are some key takeaways:

1. Velocity of adoption

Though according to allthingsd.com, only about 20% of all web traffic in the US originated from a mobile device (smart phone or tablet) in 2012, Gartner expects that over 50% of web traffic in 2013 will shift to smartphones and tablets. If both allthingsd.com’s and Gartner’s numbers are correct, that would be a pretty significant shift, especially given the sudden acceleration of that change.

Relevance: Whether Gartner is reading more into the web-enabled device mobile-to-computer curve or not (see infographic above), the shift to devices is coming. It doesn’t really matter if that change happens in 2013, 2014 or 2015: It will happen. Consumers are increasingly likely to search for, find, discover and access your website from a mobile device than from a laptop or desktop PC. Even if that number only increases to 35% in 2013, that is 35% of your potential market. How much is that worth to your business? How many consumers are you potentially turning off or not properly converting by pursuing a digital strategy that is better suited to work in a 2010 digital environment than a 2013 digital environment?

Fix: Companies currently thinking of and designing their brands’ digital experiences and/or e-commerce sites primarily for laptop and desktop users need to adjust their strategy asap. The web is no longer about computers. And we aren’t just talking about website design but search, purpose/utility, UX/UI, e-commerce and social features.

2. 2011-2013: Mobile Sales Explode

Speaking of e-commerce, key indicators like Black Friday sales show an increase of 40% in online purchases made from a mobile device between 2011 to 2012. The number of online shoppers using mobile devices to make a purchase on Black Friday increased by 166% between 2011 and 2012. Paypal also reported a 190% increase in mobile payment volume between 2011 and 2012.

Relevance: Consumers aren’t only accessing websites from mobile devices with greater frequency and in greater volume, they are also becoming increasingly comfortable making purchases from their mobile devices as well. If you are not actively working to make your products easy to purchase via mobile devices, you are leaving money on the table. E-commerce is now indivisible from mobile commerce. What’s your strategy?

Fix: You basically have two options to make this work. The first is to create simple, painless, even fun mobile shopping purchasing experiences for your customers (see Nespresso example below), or you can work with key retailers to ensure that they create simple, painless, even fun mobile shopping and purchasing experiences for your (their) customers. Two examples:

a) Direct-to-consumer sales: Nespresso.

Nespresso sells espresso machines and espresso capsules/pods for those machines. Though every Nespresso product can also be purchased via Nespresso’s website, the company also created a mobile/tablet app that allows customers to order items (especially the capsules) on the fly. The process is quick and easy and is a lot quicker than opening up a browser, looking for a website, navigating through it to find the right page and finally order products.

b) Distribution model: Amazon

Amazon’s web experience is already pretty stellar but their app also allows shoppers to scan bar codes, search for a product by snapping a photograph of it, and so on. Everything about Amazon is geared towards ironing out hurdles between the search/shopping phase of the digital experience and the purchase/order phase of the digital experience. In addition, Amazon has been known to experiment with themed, seasonal mobile and tablet apps like the Santa App they launched in December 2011 (see below) to help children help tell Santa what they wanted for Christmas.

3. Adjusting expectations

44% of mobile app users who will ultimately make in-app purchases take 10 visits to finally take that step. 33% will make a purchase between their second and ninth visit. 22% will become customers after using your app only once. 22% isn’t bad, but remember not to try and set unrealistic goals for your digital team. And remember to design your app around realistic consumer behaviors and not in opposition to them.

Relevance: If your mobile app doesn’t enable and drive some kind of transaction, you probably haven’t designed it with the right objectives in mind.  Also, if your mobile app doesn’t make your customers’ shopping experience easier or better than it was before you launched the app, then it probably doesn’t offer enough value to be effective. Don’t just focus on what you hope customers will do but on why they should want to do it in the first place.

Fix: Don’t create an app just “to be in mobile.” Create an app that improves your customers’ lives in some way and/or solves a problem for them. If you are a retailer, it could simplify the shopping/purchasing/ordering process. If you are a utility, it could help customers pay their bills, browse services they don’t currently know, manage their utility usage, etc. If you are an insurance company, it might (in addition to scheduling payments) provide tips, real-time assistance and even file claims. (Think about car accidents, unexpected visits to the emergency room, etc.).

Note: Having a presence on social media channels can play a crucial part in the process of value creation we just outline. Listening to your customers (and your competitor’s customers) with the help of digital monitoring tools (yes, like Tickr) can help you identify pain points/areas of improvement. These could be turned into your mobile app’s key value-add features and make the difference between your app just being there and your app being a commercial success. Ideally, your presence on social channels also drives a healthy dialog between your company and your customers (don’t just listen to what they’re saying: also respond, ask for their advice, acknowledge their contribution to their process and reward them for their help), but even if you haven’t built that type of social practice yet, active listening will make a world of difference in your app’s ideation process. Don’t just guess. Go find out. It’s easy to do now. All you need are the right tools.

That’s it for today. We hope this post was helpful. And if you aren’t using Tickr Command Center yet, check out what we can do for you here.

You can also come say hello on Facebook and Twitter. We won’t spam you with useless marketing content. Scout’s honor.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team.


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In our last post, we talked about the need for companies to start thinking beyond social marketing. The reasons are simple:

1. If all your business does on social channels is market itself, anyone who isn’t already an ardent fan will eventually tune you out.

2. Social marketing is not social business. If you want to truly establish social business practices (and there are clear business advantages to doing it), you are going to have to incorporate social media into critical, non-marketing functions outside of marketing. (Say customer support, business development, community management, HR, etc.)

Last time, we focused on customer support. Today, let’s take a look at crisis management.

The first piece of knowledge we want to put on the table is that PR crises today are not like the PR crises of yesteryear. Because of social channels, they now snowball at an exponential rate. Whatever the cause may be (an insensitive tweet fired off by your digital agency, photos of your CEO hunting elephant, one of your drilling rigs blowing up off the coast of Florida or your airline breaking guitars), the mechanics of the crisis management game have changed. Without a digital crisis management action plan, you’re dead in the water. Worse, without a digital monitoring practice, you’ll never even know what hit you. So what do you say we take a quick look at how crisis management looks to the eyes of a company whose social business investment includes more than just marketing?

Not too long ago, @KitchenAid’s had to deal with a PR crisis of its own. We took some screen shots of what it looked like on our own dashboard. If you aren’t familiar with what happened and what the crisis was about, you can catch up here (just remember to come back).

Let’s start at the beginning:

1. Discovery

The more vigilant you are, the easier it will be to avoid major PR disasters. It really isn’t complicated. And thanks to modern digital tools, all it takes to set up an early warning system for your company is the will to do so, and a little bit of forward thinking on the part of your brand or product management team. (If you don’t want to do it internally, you can easily work with your agency of record to set something up.)

In the case of KitchenAid, the crisis was identified early. This allowed management to start working on it in that first hour, which is critical given that Mashable first reported on the incident about an hour after it happened.) Speed matters.

Tip: Since you can’t necessarily anticipate what a PR crisis will be about, it’s difficult to set up keyword searches in advance. Usually, monitoring your brand and product names will have to do. However, note the increase in volume of mentions in the above screenshot (to the right of the vertical orange line). Do you see it? It looks like a wave. Using a monitoring tool that provides some measure of data visualization can help you spot sudden changes in the volume of mentions. Such a change doesn’t have to be negative, but it is a warning that something has happened and that you need to look into it.

You may also want to see where the complaints are coming from and how they are spreading over time. One of our screens comes with a handy map you can zoom in and out of, so whether you are a global brand looking to gauge the overall impact of a PR crisis over time or a chain with retail outlets across several regions, you can pinpoint the precise location of brand mentions anywhere in the world and see exactly where your trouble spots are (center of image). You can also click on those points of mention and see exactly what was said and by whom. A menu also lets you select what channels you want to monitor on the map, so if you only want to look at Twitter and blogs, you can do that. Tickr Command Center also plots the number of mentions per channel (top right of image below) so you can get a sense for each channel’s impact on the crisis itself (and its resolution). Handy if you need to prioritize your efforts or just like to have extra points of data in hand when you deliver your report to the powers that be.

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2. Analysis

This is where it helps to have a PR professional in place who understands the mechanics, culture and language of digital crisis management, and a digital team that is capable of executing on a coordinated response. Monitoring alone can’t fix it. (Hey, we can only do so much.) Competent and well-prepared humans have to handle the response.

Tip: Your response should be quick. By quick, we don’t mean 24 hours like in the good old days. We don’t even mean 2 hours. We mean inside of 10 minutes. The quicker the response, the shorter and smaller the crisis. It pays to be vigilant and ready.

Tickr Command Center lets you drill down into particular time segments to see (live or retroactively) how conversations about your product or brand are evolving:

3. Response

How a company first responds to a crisis will set the stage for everything that comes afterwards. Here is a quick primer on how to respond to a crisis quickly and effectively:

  1. Introduce yourself. Use your name and your title.
  2. Frame the situation for the public. State the facts. What happened? When did it happen? What is your actual position in regards to the crisis? Apologize. Don’t spin. Don’t lie. Establish trust and leadership.
  3. Communicate to the public what comes next and what they should expect.
  4. Communicate to the press the response schedule and structure, and the means by which they should obtain information from you.
  5. Communicate developments and milestones with the public as they happen (the frequency will depend on the crisis). Err on the side of giving them too many updates. Make them feel that you are dedicated to fixing the problem in the most expedient and transparent way possible.

To KitchenAid’s credit, this process is precisely the one that was used by Cynthia Soledad and the company’s crisis team, and it worked. Note that the crisis abated shortly after KitchenAid’s official response. (See red line in the screen shot above.)

4. Management

There are essentially two main pieces to the management phase. The first is a continuation of the “update the public” function that began in the response phase. This can involve the creation of a crisis page and a Twitter account alongside existing communications channels. (BP did this during the Deep Sea Horizon crisis.) The second is the direct interaction between the company and the public across social platforms. That is where community management, the creation of discussion groups and tabs, the publishing of fact sheets becomes very important. In some cases, (like the posting of an offensive tweet) a quick explanation of what happened and an apology will do the job. In other instances, the problem goes far deeper than that and will require more work. (Examples: An investigation by a major news organization just uncovered that your company employs child labor in a number of countries around the world. A report from a global ecological watchdog paints your company as being a major source of air or water pollution. Your CEO has just found himself connected to a damaging corruption scandal. These sorts of things won’t just go away with an apology.)

Whether your crisis can easily handled with an apology and a few hours of work on social channels or will require months of heavy lifting and changes made to your business practices, by engaging with the public and listening to their complaints, a company can identify key topics they need to focus on. These topics will frame the conversation that the public ultimately wants to have with the company. The more focus exchanges have, the more likely it is that they can be shifted from pointless noise to purposeful signal. Here, listening with purpose will make all the difference in the world.

Once a company has identified topics and themes, it can dig deeper and identify specific complaints that relate to them. Once these complaints have been clarified, the discussion process can now be shifted from conflict to collaboration. Remember that every complaint simply identifies a problem. Once a problem is identified, all the company has to do is acknowledge it, drill down into the specific objections, and ask the public how it would solve it. In doing so, the company moved the dynamics of its relationship with an angry public from conflict to collaboration.

The next step is to rededicate your company’s focus to fixing the problem. Even if the best you can realistically offer is an incremental process that could take years, start that process. Show that the issue matters by turning the change into an initiative. Pledge to work on it. Recruit the help of the public. Partner with them. Make them part owners of the solution. Reward them for their help.

In the case of KitchenAid, the problem was far more easily solved, but it’s important to understand that while some PR crisis may only turn into a rough few days, others can cost companies everything. It’s important to have measure in place to make sure that each type of PR crisis is handled properly and that as little as possible is left to chance.

5. Post-crisis monitoring & advocacy

This part is simply the follow-through. Now that the crisis itself has ended, it’s time to button things up. What did you miss? What did you learn? What comes next?

Don’t let the deflation of the wave of mentions be your only guide. News cycles are short-lived nowadays. People will grow bored of a scandal or PR crisis after a few short days, no matter how effective a company was at addressing and managing it. But just because people have moved on to another topic doesn’t mean that your troubles are over. Don’t mistake changes in the volume of mentions for resolution. Your image may have been tarnished even if you aren’t the hot topic on Twitter anymore. That’s just as dangerous.

Note: If the root cause of the crisis was not resolved, it will stick. It will become part of the brand’s story. It may even become the defining feature of the brand for years to come – a stain on its reputation that won’t easily go away once it grows roots. You don’t want that. A crisis can’t just go away. It has to be resolved.

In the case of KitchenAid, here is what things looked like two weeks later:

The only way to find out if it has been resolved or if it has just gone away for a while is to monitor conversations about the brand once the crisis has subsided. There is a short term piece to this, and there is a long term piece as well. You want to gauge the impact of what you’ve done, and make adjustments along the way until you can be certain that the crisis, its cause, and the expectations of the public have been worked through. Once that’s done, look for people who are not aware that you have resolved the problem, and politely, kindly engage them. Show them the progress you’ve made. Link to what you have done and what you are doing. Inform, inform, inform. Whom you inform, when, how and why cannot happen in a vacuum. Monitoring for specific types of opinions and conversations can help you target the right people at the right time with the right information. This allows you to get your message across quickly and effectively without requiring major media buys and hit-or-miss campaigns. Think major cost-savings, sure, but think also of speed and effectiveness.

We hope that was helpful. So again, the point today was threefold:

1. Run you through the 5 phases of a digital crisis as seen through the eyes of a digital crisis management team that uses Tickr Command Center as one of its tools.

2. Show you yet another reason why creating social business practices (or having a “social media strategy”) should focus on a lot more than just creating and publishing social marketing content.

3. Illustrate the real value of looking at social media investment and activity beyond just social marketing.

If you aren’t using Tickr Command Center yet, check out what we can do for you here. (There’s a lot more to it than what we showed you today). Bear in mind that a tool like Command Center doesn’t need to necessarily replace other monitoring software. Most of our users tend to pair Tickr with a half dozen or more other digital management solutions in order to amplify their capabilities. Definitely try us out.

You can also come say hello on Facebook and Twitter. We won’t spam you with useless marketing content. Scout’s honor.

Cheers,

The Tickr Team.

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Last week at Dachis Group’s annual Social Business Summit in Austin (#SBS2013), several hundred digital professionals from all over the world came together to hear about how far Social Business has come in the past year and how far it yet has to go. (Great way to kick off #SxSWi if you ask us.) Among the speakers were Tony Hsieh of Zappos, Estee Lauder‘s Marisa Thalberg, Livestrong Foundation‘s Doug Ulman, Deloitte‘s John Hagel, Oracle‘s Erika Jolly Brookes, Edelman Digital‘s Michael Brito, Altimeter Group‘s Brian Solis, and Olivier Blanchard, who has been helping us with a few things around here.

One of the central themes of the event, at least from our perspective, is that businesses cannot truly become social businesses if all they focus on is social marketing. It isn’t that social marketing isn’t important. It is. It’s very important. But as Olivier put it in his session, many businesses today may be putting too many of their social and digital eggs in one basket. There is far more to Social Business than just marketing. Customer service, community development, business development, sales, human resources are among the many business functions which could benefit from an injection of “social.”

(We also couldn’t help but notice how Tony Hsieh never once mentioned Facebook, Twitter, Social Media or even marketing in his session. Instead, he emphasized culture, community, and people coming together organically to build things worth building.) There’s a much bigger conversation there about what “social” means, but for now, let’s stick to the subject at hand: Social Business. More to the point: For businesses to realize the full potential of Social Business, they need to focus on more than just Social Marketing. Today, we want to focus squarely on Customer Service. Why? Two reasons:

1. We have seen time and time again that real-time monitoring of brand, product and keyword mentions turns up a healthy batch of opportunities to fix problems for customers in a timely, cost-effective, and even impressive fashion.

2. Since it costs 6x more to acquire a new customer than to retain one, it makes perfect business sense to spend a little time focusing your social business efforts on customer retention. In other words, when a customer complains about something, be there to do what you can to fix the problem. Don’t just let them walk away angry (unless you owe your competitors a favor or something).

Our visual aid today is a wonderful infographic by the folks at BlueWolf, who were kind enough to compile data from Gartner, Aberdeen, and International Data Corporation and put it all together in one convenient place. (Top of post.) Here is what jumped out at us:

Missed Opportunity

Only 20% of Fortune 500 companies actively engage with their customers on Facebook (real engagement, not just marketing-related).

58% of people who have tweeted about a problem have never received a response from the offending company.

In 2010, only 25% of enterprises were using social channels to respond to customer service issues. By 2020, the number will be 90%. Given that this shift is an inevitability, why wait? What is the upside of being among the last companies in the world to focus on social customer service? What is the competitive advantage of being the slowest to adopt a new technology we know is as important as email and the telephone were in their time?

87% of customers demand and expect better customer service than what is available to them today.

Small efficiency improvements in customer service can improve customer retention by a factor of 5x-10x.

The Cost of Not Being There

17% of customers will abandon your company after only one negative customer service experience.

40% of customers will abandon your company after only two negative customer service experiences.

85% of your business could be lost solely because of bad customer service.

A 1% improvement in first call response (a staggering 52% of inbound calls are not resolved in the first call) results in an average $276,000 in operational savings. (SQM benchmark.) That’s just a 1% improvement. Imagine a 5% improvement. In other words, imagine shifting just 5% of your inbound calls to social response channels; or better yet, catching just 5% of the customer service opportunities you are currently not monitoring for on social channels.

3x as many internal resources are required to acquire a new customer than to retain one. (It’s a lot easier and cheaper to retain customers than it is to replace angry ones with entirely new ones. Every customer you lose because of lousy customer service is terribly costly to replace.)

The Changing Mechanisms of Customer Service

Though social channels in customer support currently only account for 13% of interaction volume (against 40% of inbound calls, 29% in person, and 18% email), demand is outpacing capacity enough that it is expected to grow 53% in the next year alone.

Monitoring of social channels for negative mentions and opportunities to help a customer in need used to be difficult. Today, it is simply a matter of wanting to be there.

One of the main reasons why so much focus has been placed on social marketing is that most social media program owners hail from the world of Marketing, Advertising and PR. According to a 2013 study by Altimeter group, only about 1% of social media program owners came from customer service backgrounds. This imbalance has likely been the chief reason why social customer service has, until now, not received as much operational attention as it should have. It’s an easy fix though, especially when you factor in ever-improving community management tools, social CRM solutions, and multi-channel monitoring suites (like Tickr’s very own Command Center) currently on the market.

Thanks again to the folks at BlueWolf for the infographic. Great work.

Cheers,

The Tickr team

PS: Feel free to join our growing digital community on Facebook and on Twitter and tell us what you think. (We won’t spam you. We promise.)

And if you haven’t tried Tickr yet, you should. (It’s easy. Just click here.)